DIY Halloween Costume Ideas 2016: 'Fallout 4' T-60 Power Armor Cosplay Via 3D Printing, Foams, And The Gaming Spirit

DIY Halloween Costume Ideas 2016: 'Fallout 4' T-60 Power Armor Cosplay Via 3D Printing, Foams, And The Gaming Spirit

Looking for a DIY Halloween costume/cosplay idea for 2016? This Fallout 4 3D printing enthusiast went all out for his outfit. A very meaty T-60 power armor was brought to you from the wasteland or from a printer that ground away this creation piece-by-piece for 140 continuous days, according to 3Ders.org. It seems cosplay enthusiasts that go to conventions truly impress onlookers with their creations. Some even have moving parts and bulbs that light up and for the beginner it may seem like a daunting process. This DIY Halloween costume Fallout 4 power armor idea could be quite the challenge, but if you’re passionate enough to see it through until the end, then the rewards are great. This is a rather iconic piece and there’s even a toy version of the T-60 power armor as well. The Monoprice Maker 3D Printer Goes Into Overdrive If one were to make this as a Halloween costume or a convention favorite, it could be a daunting task and it’s likely not too many people would attempt to pursue this venture, but with the help of the Monoprice Maker 3D printer it had its work cut out for it and the person responsible was hirocreations. The creator used up about 120 pounds of IC3D PLA filament for this DIY T-60 power armor costume and this accounts for printing errors, support materials, and skirts. The final product weighed 85 to 90-pounds. The 3D printer did about 80-percent of the work along with a couple of Power Spec Ultra’s being thrown into the fray later in the DIY process. The files that laid the ground work for the T-60 power armor had been taken from the game via the Bethesda Archive Extractor, which can be downloaded at Nexus Mods. Blender software was also utilized to add more onto what was missing from the original files. The T-45b Fallout 3 power armor helmet, by Daniel Lilygreen, had to be adapted to the T-60 creation along with the Raptor Hand design by e-NABLE. A Satisfying Process For The Wasteland Brotherhood Cosplayer The DIY costume created by hirocreations did have its issues, but having a 20-page checklist of each component proved helpful. It was satisfying to check off each completely printed item as it helped in keeping the creator motivated. “One of the things that really kept me motivated and moving forward was having a 20-page checklist of every part that needed to be printed or fabricated having the pleasure of checking each line off at the end of every print.” Hirocreations also had a sponsorship from the IC3D printer company for the majority of the filament. It was a good thing he had the financial backing because it would have cost him about a grand on the filament alone for the DIY prospective Halloween costume or Fallout 4 convention creation. Other Fallout Game DIY Pursuits Some time ago, Man At Arms: Reforged aired a show that put expert fabricators to the test when they were requested to put together a DIY Fallout 4 “swatter” or wasteland baseball bat with saw blades, an oak bat with nails, and the Kremvh’s Tooth weapon. All are remarkable pieces from the Commonwealth and were reproduced with the real deal. Another Fallout 4 costume that was posted on Facebook during the 2016 Halloween month was a very impressive T-60 power armor cosplay put together by Celtic Props. Though there was no DIY process found, the site touts that it makes its products from EVA foams due to the material’s versatility. Of course, a 2016 DIY Halloween costume idea of this magnitude for Fallout 4 fans may have to wait until next year considering the holiday is only several days away. You may want to mark your calendars for 2017’s Halloween holiday for this Commonwealth pursuit. [Featured Image by Vivien Killilea/Getty Images]

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