Superbug resistant to every U.S. antibiotic kills woman in Nevada

Superbug resistant to every U.S. antibiotic kills woman in Nevada

Think that superbugs and antibiotic-resistant bacteria only exist in apocalyptic sci-fi movies and internet clickbait?Public health officials said a 70-year-old resident of Washoe County arrived in the USA in August last year after an extensive visit to India.As reported by Todd and his colleagues, the woman fractured her right leg while in India and underwent multiple hospitalizations in that country over two years.”It was tested against everything that’s available in the United States … and was not effective”, Dr. Alexander Kallen, one of the report’s authors told Stat.The woman died from Klebsiella pneumoniae, which is present in the gut and commonly causes urinary tract infections, according to Stat News.Postmortem tests showed her infection might have responded to a treatment called fosfomycin, which is not approved in the United States. We have relied for so long on just newer and newer antibiotics. A report issued last year by the United Kingdom government argued that if measures aren’t taken to stem the rising tide of antibiotic resistance, 10 million people a year could be dying from superbugs by 2050-more than now die from cancer.Scientists from the health community are warning the national government about the dangers that this threat represents to the people.The case raises concern about the spread of such infections, which have become more common over past decades as germs have developed resistance to widely used antibiotics.”This is important because we are seeing increasing numbers of drug-resistant infections, and this is one of the first cases for Klebsiella where no drug options were open to the medical staff”.STAT spoke with James Johnson, a doctor at the University of Minnesota who studies infectious disease.In that report, the researchers stated that is urgent for local hospitals to start asking their incoming patients about visits they could have made to other countries and if they have been hospitalized in other foreign medical centers.It’s been estimated that annual worldwide deaths due to antibiotic-resistant bugs could reach 10 million by 2050, surpassing deaths due to diabetes and cancer combined.Both doctors stressed that the growing problem of antibiotic-resistant germs is caused by the overuse of these drugs – often for conditions for which they are useless.

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